hhantu:

franfrancatman:

My dad and I made this fishtank for my mum for Christmas a few years ago with dollhouse furniture. I thought it was pretty rad

i cant believe your mom is a fish

queendecuisine:

1863-project:

tigertwo1515:

did-you-kno:

Source

Damn

OKAY, LET’S TALK ABOUT ROBERT SMALLS (BECAUSE HE HAS A NAME, THANK YOU VERY MUCH).
ANYWAY.
Robert Smalls was born into slavery in 1839 and at the age of 12 his owner leased him out in Charleston, South Carolina. He gravitated towards working at the docks and on boats and eventually became the equivalent of a pilot, and in late 1861 he found himself assigned to a military transport boat named the CSS Planter.
On May 12, 1862, the white officers decided to spend the night on land. Smalls rounded up the enslaved crew and they hatched a plan, and once the officers were long gone they made a run for it, only stopping to pick up their families (who they notified) along the way. Smalls, disguised as the captain, steered the boat past Confederate forts (including Ft. Sumter) and over to the Union blockade, raising a white sheet his wife took from her job as a hotel maid as a flag of truce. The CSS Planter had a highly valuable code book and all manner of explosives on board.
Smalls ended up serving in the Union Navy and rose to the rank of captain there. He was also one of a number of individuals who talked to Abraham Lincoln about the possibility of African-American soldiers fighting for the Union, which became a reality.
After the war, Smalls bought his owner’s old plantation in Beaufort and even allowed the owner’s sickly wife to move back in until her death. He eventually served in the South Carolina House of Representatives (1865-1870), the South Carolina Senate (1871-1874), and the United States House of Representatives (1875-1879) and represented South Carolina’s 5th District from 1882-1883 and the 7th District from 1884-1887. He and other black politicians also fought against an amendment designed to disenfranchise black voters in 1895, but it unfortunately passed.
Smalls ended his public life by serving as U.S. Collector of Customs in Beaufort from 1889-1911. He died in 1915 at the age of 75.
And now you know Robert Smalls.

ROBERT SMALLS IS THE MAN.

xaannaax:

bookiesbooty:

It’s back.

This is my favorite video of all time


clarknokent:

vinebox:

Our generation as doctors

Me for sure as a dr


odinsblog:

A Twitter Essay by @HeerJeet: Pathologizing Black-On-Black Crime

Related: An Essay By GradientLair: Respectability Politics 

Related: Not Here for your Internalized Racism

Related: Five Myths About Black-On-Black Crime

Related: How Crime is Viewed Through The Lens of Race in America

Related: What does “Black-On-Black” Crime in Ferguson even have to do with Mike Brown?

lizinez:

Shirts i need.

cuntyhunty-y:

justswangin:

Classic

The conditioning coach for the sixers graduated from temple and he came to one of our classes to speak and he told us his first day at the sixers, somebody said “A.I…this is the new strength and conditioning coach” and A.I. said “fuck you telling me for, I won’t be working with em”…and then he literally didn’t speak to him for the rest of the season lmfaoo


Bryan Cranston and Aaron Paul thanking each other in their Emmy acceptance speeches